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Counseling the Worried Well Patient: Review of Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia Risk Factors

Learning Objectives
1. Compare and contrast symptoms and signs indicative of dementia and mild cognitive impairment vs. normal aging
2. Describe the factors that impact and influence healthy brain aging that have the potential to reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD)
3. Respond to a patient who asks, “I have a strong family history of Alzheimer's disease, does this mean I'll eventually have the disease?”
0.25 Credit CME

This activity is intended to meet the educational needs of primary care clinicians including internists, family physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants who are seeking additional education in the assessment, diagnosis, and ongoing health care of patients with cognitive impairment and dementia.

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Provider Education from the Alzheimer's Association®
Understand how to confidently approach the detection, diagnostic and care-planning process for your patients with cognitive impairment and dementia. Learn more

Activity Information

Credit Designation Statement: The Academy for Continued Healthcare Learning designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

AAPA accepts certificates of participation for educational activities certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ from organizations accredited by ACCME or a recognized state medical society. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants may receive a maximum of 0.25 Category 1 credits for completing this activity.

Financial Support Disclosure Statement: ACHL requires that the faculty participating in a CME/CE activity disclose all affiliations or other financial relationships (1) with the manufacturers of any commercial product(s) and/or provider(s) of commercial services discussed in an educational presentation and (2) with any commercial supporters of the activity. All conflicts of interest have been resolved prior to this CME/CE activity.

The following financial relationships have been provided:

Eric McDade, D.O., has no relevant financial relationships to disclose.

David B. Carr, M.D., has no relevant financial relationships to disclose.

Lenise Cummings-Vaughn, M.D., has no relevant financial relationships to disclose.

Discussion of Off-Label, Investigational, or Experimental Drug/Device Use: None

Authors:

David B. Carr, M.D.

Eric McDade, D.O.

Lenise Cummings-Vaughn, M.D.

References:
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