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Association of Prenatal Cannabis Exposure With Psychosis Proneness Among Children in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study

Educational Objective To review potential long-term consequences of prenatal exposure and need for evaluation.
1 Credit CME

Mirroring increases in the general population, the prevalence of past-month marijuana use among pregnant mothers in the United States increased by 75% between 2002 (2.85%) and 2016 (4.98%).1 Although cannabis use has been linked to psychosis, little is known about prenatal exposure.2,3 Unprecedented increases in marijuana use during pregnancy, alongside evidence that cannabis use is correlated with psychosis and that endocannabinoids play an important role in neurodevelopment, highlight the importance of evaluating potential long-term consequences of prenatal exposure.4

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Article Information

Accepted for Publication: December 25, 2018.

Corresponding Author: Ryan Bogdan, PhD, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, CB 1125, Washington University in St Louis, One Brookings Drive, St Louis, MO 63110 (rbogdan@wustl.edu).

Published Online: March 27, 2019. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2019.0076

Author Contributions: Mr Fine and Dr Bogdan had full access to all the data in the study and take responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analyses.

Concept and design: Fine, Moreau, Agrawal, Barch, Bogdan.

Acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data: Fine, Moreau, Karcher, Rogers, Barch, Bogdan.

Drafting of the manuscript: Fine, Moreau, Bogdan.

Critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content: Moreau, Karcher, Agrawal, Rogers, Barch, Bogdan.

Statistical analysis: Fine, Moreau, Agrawal, Bogdan.

Obtained funding: Barch.

Administrative, technical, or material support: Barch, Bogdan.

Supervision: Bogdan.

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: Drs Agrawal, Rogers, Barch, and Bogdan reported receiving grants from the National Institute of Health (NIH) during the conduct of the study. No other disclosures were reported.

Funding/Support: Data for this study were provided by the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study, which was funded by awards U01DA041022, U01DA041025, U01DA041028, U01DA041048, U01DA041089, U01DA041093, U01DA041106, U01DA041117, U01DA041120, U01DA041134, U01DA041148, U01DA041156, U01DA041174, U24DA041123, and U24DA041147 from the NIH and additional federal partners (https://abcdstudy.org/federal-partners.html). The following grants were also received from the NIH: MH 014677 (Dr Karcher); K02 DA32573 (Dr Agrawal); R01 MH113883, R01 MH066031, U01 MH109589, U01A005020803, and R01 MH090786 (Dr Barch); and R01 AG045231, R01 HD083614, and R01 AG052 564 (Dr Bogdan).

Role of the Funder/Sponsor: The NIH had no role in the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript; and decision to submit the manuscript for publication.

References
1.
Agrawal  A, Rogers  CE, Lessov-Schlaggar  CN, Carter  EB, Lenze  SN, Grucza  RA.  Alcohol, cigarette, and cannabis use between 2002 and 2016 in pregnant women from a nationally representative sample  [published online November 5, 2018].  JAMA Pediatr. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2018.3096PubMedGoogle Scholar
2.
Zammit  S, Thomas  K, Thompson  A,  et al.  Maternal tobacco, cannabis and alcohol use during pregnancy and risk of adolescent psychotic symptoms in offspring.  Br J Psychiatry. 2009;195(4):294-300. doi:10.1192/bjp.bp.108.062471PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
3.
Day  NL, Goldschmidt  L, Day  R, Larkby  C, Richardson  GA.  Prenatal marijuana exposure, age of marijuana initiation, and the development of psychotic symptoms in young adults.  Psychol Med. 2015;45(8):1779-1787. doi:10.1017/S0033291714002906PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
4.
Volkow  ND, Compton  WM, Wargo  EM.  The risks of marijuana use during pregnancy.  JAMA. 2017;317(2):129-130. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.18612PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
5.
Karcher  NR, Barch  DM, Avenevoli  S,  et al.  Assessment of the Prodromal Questionnaire–Brief Child Version for measurement of self-reported psychoticlike experiences in childhood.  JAMA Psychiatry. 2018;75(8):853-861. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2018.1334PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
6.
Achenbach  TM.  The Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment (ASEBA): Development, Findings, Theory and Applications. Burlington, VT: University of Vermont Research Center for Children, Youth, and Families; 2009.
7.
Wu  CS, Jew  CP, Lu  HC.  Lasting impacts of prenatal cannabis exposure and the role of endogenous cannabinoids in the developing brain.  Future Neurol. 2011;6(4):459-480. doi:10.2217/fnl.11.27PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
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