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Association of Marijuana Laws With Teen Marijuana UseNew Estimates From the Youth Risk Behavior Surveys

Educational ObjectiveTo review if marijuana laws in the United States is associated with an change in usages among teens.
1 Credit CME

In the United States, 33 states and the District of Columbia have passed medical marijuana laws (MMLs), while 10 states and the District of Columbia have legalized the recreational use of marijuana. Policy makers are particularly concerned that legalization for either medicinal or recreational purposes will encourage marijuana use among youth. Repeated marijuana use during adolescence may lead to long-lasting changes in brain function that adversely affect educational, professional, and social outcomes.1

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Article Information

Accepted for Publication: March 20, 2019.

Corresponding Author: D. Mark Anderson, PhD, Department of Agricultural Economics and Economics, Montana State University, PO Box 172920, Bozeman, MT 59717-2920 (dwight.anderson@montana.edu).

Published Online: July 8, 2019. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2019.1720

Author Contributions: Dr Sabia had full access to all of the data in the study and takes responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis.

Concept and design: All authors.

Acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data: Anderson, Hansen, Sabia.

Drafting of the manuscript: Anderson, Hansen, Rees.

Critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content: Anderson, Rees, Sabia.

Statistical analysis: Hansen, Sabia.

Obtained funding: Anderson.

Administrative, technical, or material support: Anderson, Hansen.

Supervision: Anderson, Rees.

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported.

Funding/Support: This study received support from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development of the National Institutes of Health (research infrastructure grant R24 HD042828, Dr Anderson, to the Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology at the University of Washington, where Dr Anderson was a fellow) and the Center for Health Economics & Policy Studies at San Diego State University, including grant funding received from the Charles Koch Foundation to Dr Sabia.

Role of the Funder/Sponsor: The funders had no role in the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript; and decision to submit the manuscript for publication.

Disclaimer: The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

Additional Contributions: Kevin Hsu, BA (San Diego State University), and Alicia Marquez, BS (San Diego State University), served as research assistants. Both individuals received compensation as research assistants.

References
1.
Volkow  ND, Baler  RD, Compton  WM, Weiss  SR.  Adverse health effects of marijuana use.  N Engl J Med. 2014;370(23):2219-2227. doi:10.1056/NEJMra1402309PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
2.
Sarvet  AL, Wall  MM, Fink  DS,  et al.  Medical marijuana laws and adolescent marijuana use in the United States: a systematic review and meta-analysis.  Addiction. 2018;113(6):1003-1016. doi:10.1111/add.14136PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
3.
Cerdá  M, Wall  M, Feng  T,  et al.  Association of state recreational marijuana laws with adolescent marijuana use.  JAMA Pediatr. 2017;171(2):142-149. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.3624PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
4.
Dilley  JA, Richardson  SM, Kilmer  B, Pacula  RL, Segawa  MB, Cerdá  M.  Prevalence of cannabis use in youths after legalization in Washington State.  JAMA Pediatr. 2019;173(2):192-193. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2018.4458PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
5.
Anderson  DM, Hansen  B, Rees  DI.  Medical marijuana laws and teen marijuana use.  Am Law Econ Rev. 2015;17(2):495-528. doi:10.1093/aler/ahv002Google ScholarCrossref
6.
Ferner  M. Why marijuana should be legalized: ‘regulate marijuana like alcohol’ campaign discusses why pot prohibition has been a failure. Huffington Post. August 28, 2012. https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/08/28/why-marijuana-should-be-legalized_n_1833751.html. Accessed May 24, 2019.
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