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Recovery From Severe COVID-19Leveraging the Lessons of Survival From Sepsis

Educational Objective
To understand the need for critical illness recovery programs for those hospitalized with severe COVID-19
1 Credit CME

As of July 30, 2020, more than 17 million people worldwide have been diagnosed with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), and more than 665 000 have died. In many countries, the rate of diagnosis continues to increase; for example, more than 50 000 new cases per day were reported in the US during the last week of July.

Patients with severe disease, which affects up to 20% of those hospitalized with COVID-19, develop viral sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). While there has been substantial focus on the potentially unique manifestations of infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), many of the acute manifestations and outcomes of severe COVID-19 are similar to those of sepsis caused by other pathogens.

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Article Information

Corresponding Author: Hallie C. Prescott, MD, MSc, Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, 2800 Plymouth Rd, North Campus Research Center, Bldg 16, 341E, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2800 (hprescot@med.umich.edu).

Published Online: August 5, 2020. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.14103

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: Dr Prescott reported receiving grants from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the Department of Veterans Affairs and serving on the Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines panel. Dr Girard reported receiving grants from NIH outside the submitted work.

Funding/Support: This article is the result of work supported with resources and use of facilities at the Ann Arbor VA Medical Center.

Role of the Funder/Sponsor: The funder had no role in the preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript; and decision to submit the manuscript for publication.

Disclaimer: This content does not represent the views of the Department of Veterans Affairs or the US government.

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