[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]

Regardless of Age, Obesity and Hypertension Increase Risks With COVID-19

Educational Objective
To understand how obesity and hypertension increase risks with COVID-19
1 Credit CME

Older age has consistently been associated with higher mortality in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).1,2 Unfortunately, as shown by Cunningham et al3 in this issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, COVID-19 does not spare young people. Using a national all-payer hospital database, the investigators identified 3222 nonpregnant adults aged 18 to 34 years who were admitted to US hospitals for COVID-19. Morbidity was substantial: 21% required intensive care, and 2.7% died. Mortality was higher among those who had obesity, hypertension, and male sex, as has been noted in general adult populations.

Sign in to take quiz and track your certificates

Buy This Activity

JN Learning™ is the home for CME and MOC from the JAMA Network. Search by specialty or US state and earn AMA PRA Category 1 CME Credit™ from articles, audio, Clinical Challenges and more. Learn more about CME/MOC

Article Information

Published Online: September 9, 2020. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2020.5415

Corresponding Author: Mitchell Katz, MD, NYC Health and Hospitals, 125 Worth St, Room 514, New York, NY 10013 (mitchell.katz@nychhc.org).

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported.

References
1.
Gasselli  G , Greco  M , Zanella  A ,  et al.  Risk factors associated with mortality among patients with COVID-19 in intensive care units in Lombardy, Italy.   JAMA Intern Med. Published online July 15, 2020. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2020.3539Google Scholar
2.
Guptas  S , Hayek  SS , Wang  W.   et al.  Factors associated with health in critically ill patients with coronavirus disease 2019 in the United States.   JAMA Intern Med. Published online July 15, 2020. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2020.3596Google Scholar
3.
Cunningham  JW , Vaduganathan  M , Claggett  BL ,  et al.  Clinical outcomes in young US adults hospitalized with COVID-19.   JAMA Intern Med. Published online September 9, 2020. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2020.5313Google Scholar
If you are not a JN Learning subscriber, you can either:
Subscribe to JN Learning for one year
Buy this activity
jn-learning_Modal_LoginSubscribe_Purchase
Close
If you are not a JN Learning subscriber, you can either:
Subscribe to JN Learning for one year
Buy this activity
jn-learning_Modal_LoginSubscribe_Purchase
Close
With a personal account, you can:
  • Access free activities and track your credits
  • Personalize content alerts
  • Customize your interests
  • Fully personalize your learning experience
Education Center Collection Sign In Modal Right
Close

Name Your Search

Save Search
Close
With a personal account, you can:
  • Track your credits
  • Personalize content alerts
  • Customize your interests
  • Fully personalize your learning experience
jn-learning_Modal_SaveSearch_NoAccess_Purchase
Close

Lookup An Activity

or

Close

My Saved Searches

You currently have no searches saved.

Close
With a personal account, you can:
  • Access free activities and track your credits
  • Personalize content alerts
  • Customize your interests
  • Fully personalize your learning experience
Education Center Collection Sign In Modal Right
Close