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COVID-19 Infection—Preventing Clinical Deterioration

Educational Objective
To identify the key insights or developments described in this article
1 Credit CME

More than 38 million individuals worldwide have been infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, the virus causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). For primary prevention, traditional public health approaches include wearing masks, physical distancing, contact tracing, and quarantine. These steps are the current standard of care as the world awaits the results of randomized trials of vaccines and monoclonal antibodies. For the treatment of patients with serious illness in the hospital, corticosteroids have emerged as the standard of care.1,2

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Article Information

Published Online: November 12, 2020. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.21720

Corresponding Author: Christopher W. Seymour, MD, MSc, Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Keystone Building, 3520 Fifth Ave, Ste 100, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (seymourcw@upmc.edu).

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: Dr Seymour reported receiving grants from the National Institutes of Health and receiving personal fees from Beckman Coulter and Edwards Lifesciences Inc. No other disclosures were reported.

References
1.
Prescott  HC , Rice  TW .  Corticosteroids in COVID-19 ARDS.   JAMA. 2020;324(13):1292-1295. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
2.
Sterne  JAC , Murthy  S , Diaz  JV ,  et al.  Association between administration of systemic corticosteroids and mortality among critically ill patients with COVID-19.   JAMA. 2020;324(13):1330-1341. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
3.
Lenze  EJ , Mattar  C , Zorumski  CF ,  et al.  Fluvoxamine vs placebo and clinical deterioration in outpatients with symptomatic COVID-19: a randomized clinical trial.   JAMA. Published online November 12, 2020. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.22760 Google Scholar
4.
Kim  PS , Read  SW , Fauci  AS .  Therapy for early COVID-19: a critical need.   JAMA. Published online November 11, 2020. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.22813 Google Scholar
5.
Kalil  AC .  Treating COVID-19—off-label drug use, compassionate use, and randomized clinical trials during pandemics.   JAMA. 2020;323(19):1897-1898. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
6.
Califf  RM , Hernandez  AF , Landray  M .  Weighing the benefits and risks of proliferating observational treatment assessments.   JAMA. 2020;324(7):625-626. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
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