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A Nursing Researcher’s Experience in a COVID-19 Vaccine Trial

Educational Objective
To identify the key insights or developments described in this article
1 Credit CME

I was scrolling through Instagram in early August 2020 when I saw an advertisement that caught my attention. Usually, I swipe past these without a second glance, but this was for the Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine trial. It was recruiting participants for the highly publicized phase 3 trial of a new vaccine, BNT162b2, that had shown promising results earlier in the year. As a nurse and researcher who has encountered social media recruitment in my own work—and has closely followed the COVID-19 vaccine trials—I was curious to see how Pfizer planned to convince 30 000 people in the US to volunteer. I clicked on the advertisement.

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CME Disclosure Statement: Unless noted, all individuals in control of content reported no relevant financial relationships. If applicable, all relevant financial relationships have been mitigated.

Article Information

Corresponding Author: Kristen R. Choi, PhD, RN, School of Nursing, University of California, 700 Tiverton Ave, Room 3-238, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (krchoi@ucla.edu).

Published Online: December 7, 2020. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2020.7087

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: Dr Choi reported grants from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality outside the submitted work.

References
1.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. United States COVID-19 cases and deaths by state. Accessed September 25, 2020. https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#cases_casesinlast7days
2.
Walsh  EE , Frenck  R , Falsey  AR ,  et al.  RNA-based COVID-19 vaccine BNT162b2 selected for a pivotal efficacy study.   medRxiv. Preprint posted online August 20, 2020. doi:10.1101/2020.08.17.20176651Google Scholar
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