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Public Mobility and Social Media Attention in Response to COVID-19 in Sweden and Denmark

Educational Objective
To identify the key insights or developments described in this article
1 Credit CME

To reduce the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), countries have implemented different societal interventions, and evaluation of the effect on public response is needed.1 Sweden and Denmark are comparable countries in terms of health care and sociodemographic characteristics; however, Denmark was one of the first countries to enforce lockdown and subsequent gradual reopening, whereas Sweden has had few restrictions, largely limited to public recommendations. We assessed public mobility and social media attention associated with COVID-19 spread and societal interventions from February 15 to June 14, 2020, in Denmark and Sweden.

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CME Disclosure Statement: Unless noted, all individuals in control of content reported no relevant financial relationships. If applicable, all relevant financial relationships have been mitigated.

Article Information

Accepted for Publication: November 22, 2020.

Published: January 4, 2021. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.33478

Open Access: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the CC-BY License. © 2021 Zhang L et al. JAMA Network Open.

Corresponding Author: Isabell Brikell, PhD, Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Nobels väg 12 A, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden (isabell.brikell@ki.se).

Author Contributions: Drs Brikell and Zhang contributed equally to this work. Drs Brikell and Zhang had full access to all of the data in the study and take responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis.

Concept and design: Brikell, Chang.

Acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data: All authors.

Drafting of the manuscript: Brikell.

Critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content: All authors.

Statistical analysis: Zhang, Chang.

Obtained funding: Chang.

Administrative, technical, or material support: Zhang, Chang.

Supervision: Brikell, Dalsgaard, Chang.

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: Dr Brikell reported receiving grants from the Swedish Brain Foundation. Dr Dalsgaard reported receiving grants from The Lundbeck Foundation, the Novo Nordisk Foundation, the European Commission, Helsefonden, and the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme. Dr Chang reported receiving grants from the Swedish Research Council and the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare. No other disclosures were reported.

References
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