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Can We Protect Pregnant Women and Young Infants From COVID-19 Through Maternal Immunization?

Educational Objective
To identify the key insights or developments described in this article
1 Credit CME

Infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) during pregnancy and early infancy can result in severe disease.13 Less is known about the immune responses of pregnant women with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the possibility for infant protection. Vaccination of pregnant women with SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in development has begun in the United States in the context of emergency use authorized vaccine deployment for high-risk priority groups and guidance from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices and the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology.48 Therefore, it is imperative to better understand the potential of immunization during pregnancy for maternal and infant disease prevention and for the implementation of pandemic control strategies.

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Article Information

Corresponding Author: Flor M. Munoz, MD, Section of Infectious Diseases, Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, BCM-280, Houston, TX 77030 (florm@bcm.edu).

Published Online: January 29, 2021. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2021.0043

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: Dr Munoz reported serving on the data and safety monitoring boards of Moderna, Pfizer, Virometix, and Meissa Vaccines and grants from Novavax Research and Gilead Research outside the submitted work.

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