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Disparities in SARS-CoV-2 Testing in Massachusetts During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Educational Objective
To identify the key insights or developments described in this article
1 Credit CME

Early deficiencies in testing capacity have contributed to poor control of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2),1 particularly among minority (ie, Black and Latino/Latina) and socioeconomically vulnerable communities.2,3 Allocating testing resources to locations of greatest need is important to mitigate subsequent waves of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).4 In the context of improved SARS-CoV-2 testing infrastructure, we examine the alignment of testing to epidemic intensity in Massachusetts.

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Article Information

Accepted for Publication: December 21, 2020.

Published: February 9, 2021. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.37067

Correction: This article was corrected on April 23, 2021, to fix an error in Figure 2.

Open Access: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the CC-BY License. © 2021 Dryden-Peterson S et al. JAMA Network Open.

Corresponding Author: Scott Dryden-Peterson, MD, MSc, Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 (sldrydenpeterson@bwh.harvard.edu).

Author Contributions: Dr Dryden-Peterson had full access to all of the data in the study and takes responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis.

Concept and design: All authors.

Acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data: Dryden-Peterson, Velásquez, Stopka.

Drafting of the manuscript: Dryden-Peterson, Velásquez, Davey, Lockman.

Critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content: Dryden-Peterson, Velásquez, Stopka, Ojikutu.

Statistical analysis: Dryden-Peterson.

Administrative, technical, or material support: Stopka, Ojikutu.

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: Dr Dryden-Peterson reported receiving grants from the National Institutes of Health during the conduct of the study. No other disclosures were reported.

Funding/Support: The work was supported by the Harvard University Center for AIDS Research, a funded program of the National Institutes of Health (grant P30 AI060354), the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (grant K08 AI141740), the National Cancer Institute (grant R01 CA236546), the Dr Lynne Reid/Drs Eleanor and Miles Shore Fellowship at Harvard Medical School, and the Burke Global Health Fellowship at the Harvard Global Health Institute.

Role of the Funder/Sponsor: The funders had no role in the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript; and decision to submit the manuscript for publication.

Disclaimer: The contents of this manuscript are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health or the institutions with which the authors are affiliated.

References
1.
Clark  E , Chiao  EY , Amirian  ES .  Why contact tracing efforts have failed to curb coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) transmission in much of the United States.   Clin Infect Dis. Published online August 6, 2020. doi:10.1093/cid/ciaa1155PubMedGoogle Scholar
2.
Figueroa  JF , Wadhera  RK , Lee  D , Yeh  RW , Sommers  BD .  Community-level factors associated with racial and ethnic disparities in COVID-19 rates in Massachusetts.   Health Aff (Millwood). 2020:39(11):1984-1992. doi:10.1377/hlthaff.2020.01040PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
3.
Wadhera  RK , Wadhera  P , Gaba  P ,  et al.  Variation in COVID-19 hospitalizations and deaths across New York City boroughs.   JAMA. 2020;323(21):2192-2195. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.7197PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
4.
Aleta  A , Martín-Corral  D , Pastore Y Piontti  A ,  et al.  Modelling the impact of testing, contact tracing and household quarantine on second waves of COVID-19.   Nat Hum Behav. 2020;4(9):964-971. doi:10.1038/s41562-020-0931-9PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
5.
US Census Bureau. Selected household characteristics from 2014-2018 American Community Survey (5-year estimates). Published 2019. Accessed September 23, 2020. https://www.census.gov/data/developers/data-sets/acs-5year.html
6.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. CDC social vulnerability index 2018 database. Accessed September 23, 2020. https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/placeandhealth/svi/data_documentation_download.html
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