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Supplements for the Treatment of Mild COVID-19—Challenging Health Beliefs With Science From A to Z

Educational Objective
To identify the key insights or developments described in this article
1 Credit CME

“The good thing about science is that it’s true whether or not you believe in it.”

Neil deGrasse Tyson1

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide, totaling 89.4 million cases and 1.9 million deaths globally as of January 9, 2021.2 As a result of high-quality science, several vaccines efficacious against the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have been developed in record time and deployment started, offering hope for an end to the pandemic. However, given the limited availability and uptake of vaccines, the emergence of new, more infectious variant strains of the virus, and the potential for future seasonal outbreaks, the identification of therapies that can effectively improve prognosis in patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 remains a critical area of research.

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CME Disclosure Statement: Unless noted, all individuals in control of content reported no relevant financial relationships. If applicable, all relevant financial relationships have been mitigated.

Article Information

Published: February 12, 2021. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.0431

Open Access: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the CC-BY License. © 2021 Michos ED et al. JAMA Network Open.

Corresponding Author: Erin D. Michos, MD, MHS, Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N Wolfe St, Blalock 524-B, Baltimore, MD 21287 (edonnell@jhmi.edu).

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported.

References
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The Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center. COVID-19 dashboard by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE) at Johns Hopkins University. Accessed January 9, 2021. https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/map.html
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Morales  C , Waller  A , Fazio  M . A timeline of Trump’s symptoms and treatments. The New York Times. Published October 4, 2020. Accessed January 9, 2021. https://www.nytimes.com/2020/10/04/us/trump-covid-symptoms-timeline.html
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