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Approaches for Optimal Use of Different COVID-19 VaccinesIssues of Viral Variants and Vaccine Efficacy

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To identify the key insights or developments described in this article
1 Credit CME

The efforts of the Biden administration to accelerate rollout of COVID-19 vaccines are enabling more adults in the US to be vaccinated each week. As of February 28, 2021, an estimated more than 48 million people have received at least 1 vaccine dose. Provided enough people are vaccinated, the US might be able to transition back toward prepandemic life at some point this year. However, one scenario that could adversely affect the vaccine program is the further evolution and spread of viral variants that are resistant to vaccine-induced neutralizing antibodies. It is prudent to discuss possible strategies to minimize the potential effects of this problem, and other scenarios for maximizing the benefit of available and future vaccine supplies.

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Article Information

Published Online: March 4, 2021. doi:10.1001/jama.2021.3465

Correction: This article was corrected on March 10, 2021, to remove the words “or previously infected” from the second sentence in the third paragraph.

Corresponding Author: John P. Moore, PhD, Weill Cornell Medicine, Cornell University, 1300 York Ave, New York, NY 10065 (jpm2003@med.cornell.edu).

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported.

Editor’s Note: Although preprints are rarely included as references in JAMA articles, in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic some of the information in this article is based on rapidly developing and emerging science that is only available as preliminary communications on preprint servers.

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