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Public Trust and Willingness to Vaccinate Against COVID-19 in the US From October 14, 2020, to March 29, 2021

Educational Objective
To identify the key insights or developments described in this article
1 Credit CME

The development of vaccines showing high efficacy against SARS-CoV-2 has offered a way to protect against the health effects of the virus. Yet national surveys suggest that willingness to vaccinate declined throughout 2020 and may be insufficient to provide population immunity.13 Public trust in the development of vaccines and the government approval process represents a potential crucial reason for this hesitancy. This study tested changes in trust in vaccination and vaccine hesitancy.

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Article Information

Corresponding Author: Michael Daly, PhD, Department of Psychology, Maynooth University, 1.1.7 Education House, Maynooth, Ireland (michael.a.daly@mu.ie).

Accepted for Publication: May 6, 2021.

Published Online: May 24, 2021. doi:10.1001/jama.2021.8246

Author Contributions: Dr Daly had full access to the study data and takes responsibility for the integrity of the data and accuracy of the data analysis.

Concept and design: All authors.

Acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data: Daly.

Drafting of the manuscript: Daly, Jones.

Critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content: Daly, Robinson.

Statistical analysis: Daly.

Administrative, technical, or material support: Daly.

Supervision: Robinson.

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: Dr Robinson reported receiving funding from the American Beverage Association and Unilever for projects unrelated to the present research. No other disclosures were reported.

Funding/Support: The collection of the Understanding America Study (UAS) COVID-19 tracking data was supported in part by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and by grant U01AG054580 from the National Institute on Aging. Dr Robinson’s time was partly funded by the European Research Council.

Role of the Funder/Sponsor: The funders had no role in the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript; and decision to submit the manuscript for publication.

Disclaimer: The content of this article is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the University of Southern California or UAS.

Additional Contributions: The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the European Research Council.

Additional Information: The project described in this article relies on data from survey(s) administered by the UAS, which is maintained by the Center for Economic and Social Research (CESR) at the University of Southern California.

References
1.
Daly  M , Robinson  E .  Willingness to vaccinate against COVID-19 in the US: representative longitudinal evidence from April to October 2020.   Am J Prev Med.2021;60(6):766-773. doi:10.1016/j.amepre.2021.01.008 Google ScholarCrossref
2.
Szilagyi  PG , Thomas  K , Shah  MD ,  et al.  National trends in the US public’s likelihood of getting a COVID-19 vaccine—April 1 to December 8, 2020.   JAMA. 2020;325(4):396-398. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.26419 PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
3.
Robinson  E , Jones  A , Lesser  I , Daly  M .  International estimates of intended uptake and refusal of COVID-19 vaccines: a rapid systematic review and meta-analysis of large nationally representative samples.   Vaccine. 2021;39(15):2024-2034. doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2021.02.005 PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
4.
Kapteyn  A , Angrisani  M , Bennett  D ,  et al  Tracking the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on the lives of American households.   Surv Res Methods. 2020;14(2):179-186. doi:10.18148/srm/2020.v14i2.7737Google Scholar
5.
Lopez  L  III , Hart  LH  III , Katz  MH .  Racial and ethnic health disparities related to COVID-19.   JAMA. 2021;325(8):719-720. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.26443PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
6.
Gold  JAW , Rossen  LM , Ahmad  FB ,  et al.  Race, ethnicity, and age trends in persons who died from COVID-19—United States, May–August 2020.   MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2020;69(42):1517-1521. doi:10.15585/mmwr.mm6942e1 PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
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