Diabetes Care and Glycemic Control During the COVID-19 Pandemic in the United States | Diabetes | JN Learning | AMA Ed Hub [Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]

Diabetes Care and Glycemic Control During the COVID-19 Pandemic in the United States

Educational Objective
To identify the key insights or developments described in this article
1 Credit CME

Sign in to take quiz and track your certificates

Buy This Activity

JN Learning™ is the home for CME and MOC from the JAMA Network. Search by specialty or US state and earn AMA PRA Category 1 CME Credit™ from articles, audio, Clinical Challenges and more. Learn more about CME/MOC

Article Information

Accepted for Publication: May 5, 2021.

Published Online: July 6, 2021. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2021.3047

Corresponding Author: Ateev Mehrotra, MD, MPH, Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, 180A Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115 (mehrotra@hcp.med.harvard.edu).

Author Contributions: Dr Patel had full access to all of the data in the study and takes responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis.

Concept and design: Patel, Barnett, Mehrotra.

Acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data: All authors.

Drafting of the manuscript: Patel.

Critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content: All authors.

Statistical analysis: Patel, Barnett.

Obtained funding: Mehrotra.

Administrative, technical, or material support: McCoy, Mehrotra.

Supervision: Mehrotra.

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: Dr McCoy reported grants from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) during the conduct of the study; grants from AARP and grants from NIDDK outside the submitted work. Dr Shah reported research support through Mayo Clinic from the US Food and Drug Administration to establish the Yale-Mayo Clinic Center for Excellence in Regulatory Science and Innovation (CERSI) program (U01FD005938); the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Innovation under the Transforming Clinical Practice Initiative (TCPI); the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (R01HS025164; R01HS025402; R03HS025517; K12HS026379); the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) (R56HL130496; R01HL131535; R01HL151662); the National Science Foundation; from the Medical Device Innovation Consortium as part of the National Evaluation System for Health Technology (NEST) and the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) to develop a Clinical Data Research Network (LHSNet). Dr Mehrotra reported grants from Commonwealth Fund during the conduct of the study. No other disclosures were reported.

Funding/Support: This project was supported by the Commonwealth Fund. There was also support from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (K23DK114497; RGM), National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health (K23 AG058806-01; MLB), and National Institute of Mental Health (T32MH019733; SYP).

Role of the Funder/Sponsor: The Commonwealth Fund and the National Institutes of Health had no role in the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript; and decision to submit the manuscript for publication.

Additional Contributions: We thank Rebecca Shyu, University of Missouri, for contributing to manuscript preparation efforts. She was not compensated.

References
1.
Patel  SY , Mehrotra  A , Huskamp  HA , Uscher-Pines  L , Ganguli  I , Barnett  ML .  Variation in telemedicine use and outpatient care during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States.   Health Aff (Millwood). 2021;40(2):349-358. doi:10.1377/hlthaff.2020.01786PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
2.
Patel  SY , Mehrotra  A , Huskamp  HA , Uscher-Pines  L , Ganguli  I , Barnett  ML .  Trends in outpatient care delivery and telemedicine during the COVID-19 pandemic in the US.   JAMA Intern Med. 2021;181(3):388-391. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2020.5928PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
3.
Lu  D . 2020 was especially deadly. Covid wasn’t the only culprit. New York Times. December 13, 2020. Accessed March 1, 2021. https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/12/13/us/deaths-covid-other-causes.html
4.
OptumLabs. OptumLabs and OptumLabs Data Warehouse Descriptions and Citation. July 2020. Reproduced with permission from OptumLabs.
5.
National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA). HEDIS 2018 Volume 2 technical update. Accessed March 1, 2021. https://www.ncqa.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/20171002_HEDIS_2017_OctoberUpdate.pdf
6.
Allweiss  P .  Diabetes and disasters: recent studies and resources for preparedness.   Curr Diab Rep. 2019;19(11):131. doi:10.1007/s11892-019-1258-7PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
If you are not a JN Learning subscriber, you can either:
Subscribe to JN Learning for one year
Buy this activity
jn-learning_Modal_Multimedia_LoginSubscribe_Purchase
Close
If you are not a JN Learning subscriber, you can either:
Subscribe to JN Learning for one year
Buy this activity
jn-learning_Modal_Multimedia_LoginSubscribe_Purchase
Close
With a personal account, you can:
  • Access free activities and track your credits
  • Personalize content alerts
  • Customize your interests
  • Fully personalize your learning experience
Education Center Collection Sign In Modal Right
Close

Name Your Search

Save Search
Close
With a personal account, you can:
  • Track your credits
  • Personalize content alerts
  • Customize your interests
  • Fully personalize your learning experience
jn-learning_Modal_SaveSearch_NoAccess_Purchase
Close

Lookup An Activity

or

Close

My Saved Searches

You currently have no searches saved.

Close
With a personal account, you can:
  • Access free activities and track your credits
  • Personalize content alerts
  • Customize your interests
  • Fully personalize your learning experience
Education Center Collection Sign In Modal Right
Close