Prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 Antibodies From a Serosurveillance of Kenyan Blood Donors, January to March 2021 | Global Health | JN Learning | AMA Ed Hub [Skip to Content]
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Prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 Antibodies From a National Serosurveillance of Kenyan Blood Donors, January-March 2021

Educational Objective
To identify the key insights or developments described in this article

High SARS-CoV-2 antibody levels have been achieved in most of the population in high-income countries through vaccination.1 However, global inequity exists in COVID-19 vaccine distribution, as highlighted at the June 2021 G7 Summit, which committed to providing 1 billion doses to low-income countries. This focus on doses overlooks the pace of transmission in low-income settings.

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Article Information

Corresponding Author: Sophie Uyoga, PhD, Epidemiology and Demography Department, KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme, PO Box 230, Kilifi, Kenya (suyoga@kemri-wellcome.org).

Accepted for Publication: August 23, 2021.

Published Online: September 2, 2021. doi:10.1001/jama.2021.15265

Correction: This article was corrected on September 24, 2021, to correct an error in which 2 individuals were excluded from the list of Kenya SARS-CoV-2 Serology Consortium members in the Additional Contributions section.

Author Contributions: Drs Uyoga and Scott had full access to all of the data in the study and take responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis. Drs Uyoga and Adetifa served as co–first authors and contributed equally to the work and Drs Warimwe and Scott contributed equally to the work.

Concept and design: Uyoga, Adetifa, Yegon, Warimwe, Agweyu, Scott.

Acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data: All authors.

Drafting of the manuscript: Adetifa, Scott, Otiende.

Critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content: Uyoga, Yegon, Warimwe, Agweyu, Scott.

Statistical analysis: Adetifa, Scott, Otiende.

Obtained funding: Adetifa, Warimwe, Agweyu.

Administrative, technical, or material support: Uyoga, Adetifa, Warimwe, Yegon.

Supervision: Adetifa, Warimwe, Scott.

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: Dr Warimwe reported receiving grants from Wellcome Trust during the conduct of the study. Dr Scott reported receiving grants from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the UK Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office, and Wellcome Trust during the conduct of the study and grants from Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, the National Institute for Health Research, and the Medical Reserve Corps outside the submitted work. No other disclosures were reported.

Funding/Support: This work was supported by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (INV-017547), the Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office, and Wellcome Trust (grants 220991/Z/20/Z, 203077/Z/16/Z).

Role of the Funder/Sponsor: The funding agencies had no role in the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript; and decision to submit the manuscript for publication.

Data Sharing Statement: The data shown in the article are available on request from the corresponding author. Deidentified data have been published on the Harvard Dataverse server (https://doi.org/10.7910/DVN/FQUNVD).

Disclaimer: This study has been published with the permission of the director of the Kenya Medical Research Institute. The director played no role in deciding whether to submit the manuscript for publication nor the journals to which to submit.

Additional Contributions: We thank all the blood donors for their contribution to the research. Members of the Kenya SARS-CoV-2 Serology Consortium are James Nyagwange, PhD; Henry K. Karanja, MSc; James Tuju, PhD; John Gitonga, Dip; Daisy Mugo, BSc; Johnstone Makale, BSc; Eunice W. Kagucia, PhD; Katherine E. Gallagher, PhD; Anthony Etyang, PhD; Shirine Voller, MSc; Edwine Barasa, PhD; Benjamin Tsofa, PhD; Philip Bejon, PhD; Lynette I. Ochola-Oyier, PhD (KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme, Kilifi, Kenya); Rashid Aman, PhD; Mercy Mwangangi, MSc; Patrick Amoth, MMed; Kadondi Kasera, MSc (Ministry of Health, Nairobi, Kenya); Wangari Ng’ang’a, MSc; (Presidential Policy & Strategy Unit, The Presidency, Government of Kenya), Nduku Kilonzo, PhD; Evelynn Chege, MMed; Elizabeth Odhiambo, BSc; Thomas Rotich, BSc; Irene Orgut, BSc; Sammy Kihara, Dip (Kenya National Blood Transfusion Services, Nairobi Kenya); Christian Bottomley, PhD (London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK); Teresa Lambe PhD; and Daniel Wright, MSc (Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, Oxford University, Oxford, UK).

References
1.
Weekly national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report: week 24 report (up to week 23 data). Public Health England. Accessed June 17, 2021. https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/994577/Weekly_Flu_and_COVID-19_report_w24.pdf
2.
Uyoga  S , Adetifa  IMO , Karanja  HK ,  et al.  Seroprevalence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies in Kenyan blood donors.   Science. 2021;371(6524):79-82.PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
3.
Adetifa  IMO , Uyoga  S , Gitonga  JN ,  et al.  Temporal trends of SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence during the first wave of the COVID-19 epidemic in Kenya.   Nat Commun. 2021;12(1):3966. doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24062-3PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
4.
Etyang  AO , Lucinde  R , Karanja  K ,  et al.  Seroprevalence of antibodies to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 among healthcare workers in Kenya.   Clin Infect Dis. Published online April 23, 2021. doi:10.1093/cid/ciab346Google Scholar
5.
Mattiuzzo  G , Bentley  EM , Hassall  M ,  et al. Establishment of the WHO International Standard and Reference Panel for Anti-SARS-CoV-2 Antibody. World Health Organization; 2020.
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