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Safety and Antibody Response After 1 and 2 Doses of BNT162b2 mRNA Vaccine in Recipients of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant

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To identify the key insights or developments described in this article
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COVID-19, which is due to infection with SARS-CoV-2, results in poor outcomes in patients with hematologic cancers (approximately 40% mortality rate).1,2 The efficacy of anti-SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccines has been successfully demonstrated in healthy populations3 and also has been reported in immunocompromised patients. Recently, we showed that a first injection of the BNT162b2 (Pfizer-BioNTech) vaccine induced an antibody response in 55% of 112 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients.4 Here, we document the antibody response to a second dose of BNT162b2 vaccine in an extended cohort of 117 patients.

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Article Information

Accepted for Publication: July 19, 2021.

Published: September 14, 2021. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.26344

Open Access: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the CC-BY License. © 2021 Le Bourgeois A et al. JAMA Network Open.

Corresponding Author: Patrice Chevallier, MD, PhD, Hematology Department, Nantes University Hospital, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Hotel-Dieu, Place A Ricordeau, 44093 Nantes Cedex, France (patrice.chevallier@chu-nantes.fr).

Author Contributions: Drs Le Bourgeois and Chevallier had full access to all of the data in the study and take responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis.

Concept and design: Le Bourgeois, Guillaume, Chevallier.

Acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data: All authors.

Drafting of the manuscript: Guillaume, Chevallier.

Critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content: All authors.

Statistical analysis: Béné, Chevallier.

Administrative, technical, or material support: Coste-Burel, Guillaume, Garnier, Chevallier.

Supervision: Le Bourgeois, Béné.

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: Dr Chevallier reported receiving honoraria from Pfizer outside the submitted work. No other disclosures were reported.

Additional Contributions: We thank the paramedical staff of the Hematology Department and of the Virology Department, Nantes University Hospital, for their assistance. Berthe-Marie Imbert, PharmD, PhD, Thomas Drumel, PharmD, Beatrice Mahé, MD, Viviane Dubruille, MD, Nicolas Blin, MD, Anne Lok, MD, Cyrille Touzeau, MD, PhD, Thomas Gastinne, MD, Maxime Jullien, MD, Sophie Vanthygem, MD, Philippe Moreau, MD, and Steven Le Gouill, MD, PhD (all from Nantes University Hospital), provided data and commented on the manuscript. Patricia Lespart, Nursing Diploma, Ghislaine Francois, Nursing Diploma, and Katia Godart, Nursing Diploma (all from the Hematology Department, Nantes University Hospital) administered vaccines and helped collect samples and questionnaires. None of these individuals was compensated beyond their normal salaries.

References
1.
García-Suárez  J , de la Cruz  J , Cedillo  Á ,  et al; Asociación Madrileña de Hematología y Hemoterapia (AMHH).  Impact of hematologic malignancy and type of cancer therapy on COVID-19 severity and mortality: lessons from a large population-based registry study.   J Hematol Oncol. 2020;13(1):133. doi:10.1186/s13045-020-00970-7PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
2.
Xhaard  A , Xhaard  C , D’Aveni  M ,  et al.  Risk factors for a severe form of COVID-19 after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a Société Francophone de Greffe de Moelle et de Thérapie cellulaire (SFGM-TC) multicentre cohort study.   Br J Haematol. 2021;192(5):e121-e124. doi:10.1111/bjh.17260PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
3.
Walsh  EE , Frenck  RW  Jr , Falsey  AR ,  et al.  Safety and immunogenicity of two RNA-based Covid-19 vaccine candidates.   N Engl J Med. 2020;383(25):2439-2450. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa2027906PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
4.
Chevallier  P , Coste-Burel  M , Le Bourgeois  A ,  et al  Safety and immunogenicity of a first dose of SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine in allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cells recipients.   EJHaem. Published online June 1, 2021. doi:10.1002/jha2.242PubMedGoogle Scholar
5.
Boyarsky  BJ , Werbel  WA , Avery  RK ,  et al.  Antibody response to 2-dose SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine series in solid organ transplant recipients.   JAMA. 2021;325(21):2204-2206. doi:10.1001/jama.2021.7489PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
6.
Barrière  J , Chamorey  E , Adjtoutah  Z ,  et al.  Impaired immunogenicity of BNT162b2 anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in patients treated for solid tumors.   Ann Oncol. 2021;32(8):1053-1055. doi:10.1016/j.annonc.2021.04.019PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
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