Comparison of mRNA-1273 and BNT162b2 Vaccines on Breakthrough SARS-CoV-2 Infections, Hospitalizations, and Death During the Delta-Predominant Period | Infectious Diseases | JN Learning | AMA Ed Hub [Skip to Content]
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Comparison of mRNA-1273 and BNT162b2 Vaccines on Breakthrough SARS-CoV-2 Infections, Hospitalizations, and Death During the Delta-Predominant Period

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To identify the key insights or developments described in this article
1 Credit CME

Immune responses to mRNA-1273 (Moderna) and BNT162b2 (Pfizer-BioNTech) vaccines decline by 6 months after vaccination,1 although antibody titers are higher with mRNA-1273.1,2 Comparison of vaccinated nonimmunocompromised adults showed lower risk of hospitalization for recipients of mRNA-1273 than BNT162b2 during March-August 2021.3 This study examined breakthrough infections, hospitalizations, and mortality in a general population for these 2 vaccines during the Delta period while considering risk characteristics of vaccine recipients and the varying time since vaccination.

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Article Information

Accepted for Publication: January 7, 2022.

Published Online: January 20, 2022. doi:10.1001/jama.2022.0210

Corresponding Author: Rong Xu, PhD, Center for Artificial Intelligence in Drug Discovery, 2103 Cornell Rd, Cleveland, OH 44106 (rxx@case.edu).

Author Contributions: Dr Xu had full access to all of the data in the study and takes responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis.

Concept and design: Davis, Volkow, Xu.

Acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data: All authors.

Drafting of the manuscript: Wang, Volkow, Xu.

Critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content: Wang, Davis, Kaelber, Volkow, Xu.

Statistical analysis: Wang.

Obtained funding: Xu.

Administrative, technical, or material support: Davis, Kaelber, Volkow, Xu.

Supervision: Davis, Kaelber, Volkow, Xu.

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: Dr Davis reported receiving grants from the National Institutes of Health outside the submitted work. No other disclosures were reported.

Funding/Support: The study was supported by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (grant R01AA029831), the National Institute on Aging (grants AG057557, AG061388, and AG062272), the National Institute on Drug Abuse (grant UG1DA049435), the National Cancer Institute (grant R25CA221718), and the Clinical and Translational Science Collaborative of Cleveland (grant 1UL1TR002548-01).

Role of the Funder/Sponsor: The study funders had no role in the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript; or decision to submit the manuscript for publication.

References
1.
Collier  AY , Yu  J , McMahan  K ,  et al.  Differential kinetics of immune responses elicited by Covid-19 vaccines.   N Engl J Med. 2021;385(21):2010-2012. doi:10.1056/NEJMc2115596PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
2.
Steensels  D , Pierlet  N , Penders  J , Mesotten  D , Heylen  L .  Comparison of SARS-CoV-2 antibody response following vaccination with BNT162b2 and mRNA-1273.   JAMA. 2021;326(15):1533-1535. doi:10.1001/jama.2021.15125PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
3.
Self  WH , Tenforde  MW , Rhoads  JP ,  et al; IVY Network.  Comparative effectiveness of Moderna, Pfizer-BioNTech, and Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) vaccines in preventing COVID-19 hospitalizations among adults without immunocompromising conditions—United States, March-August 2021.   MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2021;70(38):1337-1343. doi:10.15585/mmwr.mm7038e1PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
4.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. COVID Data Tracker variant proportions. Accessed December 8, 2021. https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#variant-proportions
5.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. COVID-19 and people with certain medical conditions. Accessed December 8, 2021. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/need-extra-precautions/people-with-medical-conditions.html
6.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Information for clinicians on investigational therapeutics for patients with COVID-19. Accessed December 8, 2021. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/therapeutic-options.html
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