SARS-CoV-2 Polymerase Chain Reaction Positivity Rates Among Evacuees From Afghanistan After Withdrawal of the Coalition Forces | Global Health | JN Learning | AMA Ed Hub [Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]

SARS-CoV-2 Polymerase Chain Reaction Positivity Rates Among Evacuees From Afghanistan After Withdrawal of the Coalition Forces

Educational Objective
To identify the key insights or developments described in this article
1 Credit CME

Afghanistan has been a major armed conflict zone for over 2 decades. Consequently, the response to multiple infectious disease threats, including the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, has been poor because of a lack of resources and inadequate infrastructure.1,2 In August 2021, the Western coalition forces completely withdrew from Afghanistan, which further exacerbated the shortage of critical medicines and supplies.3 Qatar was the first stop for a large proportion of evacuees en route to their final destination. We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine the rate of active SARS-CoV-2 infection among evacuees arriving in Qatar from Afghanistan.

Sign in to take quiz and track your certificates

Buy This Activity

CME Disclosure Statement: Unless noted, all individuals in control of content reported no relevant financial relationships. If applicable, all relevant financial relationships have been mitigated.

Article Information

Accepted for Publication: March 22, 2022.

Published: May 23, 2022. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.13467

Open Access: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the CC-BY License. © 2022 Butt AA et al. JAMA Network Open.

Corresponding Author: Adeel A. Butt, MBBS, MS, Hamad Medical Corporation, PO Box 3050, Doha, Qatar (aabutt@hamad.qa).

Author Contributions: Drs Butt and Masoodi had full access to all of the data in the study and take responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis. Drs Butt and Masoodi contributed equally to the study and are joint first authors.

Concept and design: Butt, Masoodi, Haidar, Al Rauili, Abou-Samra.

Acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data: Butt, Jawad, Al Rauili, Al-Marri.

Drafting of the manuscript: Butt, Masoodi, Jawad, Al Rauili.

Critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content: Butt, Haidar, Al Rauili, Al-Marri, Abou-Samra.

Statistical analysis: Jawad.

Administrative, technical, or material support: Butt, Masoodi, Haidar, Al Rauili, Al-Marri.

Supervision: Butt, Al Rauili, Abou-Samra.

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent official government views or policy of the State of Qatar or Hamad Medical Corporation.

Additional Contributions: The authors are grateful for the leadership and assistance provided by the Ministry of Public Health in Qatar, the System-Wide Incident Command and Control Center and the Business Intelligence Unit at Hamad Medical Corporation, and all the dedicated frontline health care workers who have selflessly served and provided care and comfort to all patients in Qatar.

References
1.
Bagcchi  S .  Infectious diseases in Afghanistan: a dismal scenario.   Lancet Infect Dis. 2021;21(10):1357. doi:10.1016/S1473-3099(21)00573-9PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
2.
Essar  MY , Hasan  MM , Islam  Z , Riaz  MMA , Aborode  AT , Ahmad  S .  COVID-19 and multiple crises in Afghanistan: an urgent battle.   Confl Health. 2021;15(1):70. doi:10.1186/s13031-021-00406-0PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
3.
Al-Mandhari  A .  Adapting to the events in Afghanistan: call for maintaining essential public health services and supporting critical medical supplies distribution.   East Mediterr Health J. 2021;27(9):855-856. doi:10.26719/2021.27.9.85PubMedGoogle Scholar
4.
Butt  AA , Al-Halabi  AM , Ghazouani  H ,  et al.  SARS-CoV-2 infection rates in air passengers arriving in Qatar.   J Travel Med. 2021;28(8):taab163. doi:10.1093/jtm/taab163PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
5.
Butt  AA , Dargham  SR , Chemaitelly  H ,  et al.  Severity of illness in persons infected with the SARS-CoV-2 Delta variant vs Beta variant in Qatar.   JAMA Intern Med. 2022;182(2):197-205. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2021.7949PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
6.
Worldometer. Coronavirus updates. Accessed March 19, 2022. https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/?utm_campaign=homeAdTOA
Want full access to the AMA Ed Hub?
After you sign up for AMA Membership, make sure you sign in or create a Physician account with the AMA in order to access all learning activities on the AMA Ed Hub
Buy this activity
Close
Want full access to the AMA Ed Hub?
After you sign up for AMA Membership, make sure you sign in or create a Physician account with the AMA in order to access all learning activities on the AMA Ed Hub
Buy this activity
Close
With a personal account, you can:
  • Access free activities and track your credits
  • Personalize content alerts
  • Customize your interests
  • Fully personalize your learning experience
Education Center Collection Sign In Modal Right
Close

Name Your Search

Save Search
Close
With a personal account, you can:
  • Access free activities and track your credits
  • Personalize content alerts
  • Customize your interests
  • Fully personalize your learning experience
Close

Lookup An Activity

or

Close

My Saved Searches

You currently have no searches saved.

Close

My Saved Courses

You currently have no courses saved.

Close
With a personal account, you can:
  • Access free activities and track your credits
  • Personalize content alerts
  • Customize your interests
  • Fully personalize your learning experience
Education Center Collection Sign In Modal Right
Close