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Regression Models for Ordinal Outcomes

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In the December 1, 2020, issue of JAMA, Self et al1 reported a randomized clinical trial that evaluated whether treatment with hydroxychloroquine improved clinical outcomes of adults hospitalized with COVID-19 compared with placebo. The primary outcome was the patient’s clinical status 14 days after randomization, assessed with an ordinal 7-category scale ranging from worst (“death”) to the best (“discharged from the hospital and able to perform normal activities”). The term “ordinal” is applied to an outcome measure for which its mutually exclusive categories can be ordered by their clinical preference. The primary outcome was analyzed with a multivariable ordinal logistic regression model, which is a regression model for an ordinal dependent variable. The authors found that there was not a statistically significant difference between the hydroxychloroquine and placebo groups in clinical status 14 days after randomization.

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Article Information

Corresponding Author: Benjamin French, PhD, Department of Biostatistics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 2525 West End Ave, Ste 1100, Nashville, TN 37203 (b.french@vumc.org).

Published Online: August 4, 2022. doi:10.1001/jama.2022.12104

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported.

References
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