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Comparison of Semen Quality Before and After Inactivated SARS-CoV-2 Vaccination Among Men in China

Educational Objective
To identify the key insights or developments described in this article
1 Credit CME

Mass vaccination campaigns have been conducted worldwide to control the COVID-19 pandemic. Despite reassuring safety profiles in clinical trials, vaccine hesitancy remains high among individuals of reproductive age, partially because of fertility concerns.1 Recent studies have shown that messenger RNA and viral-vector SARS-CoV-2 vaccinations do not impair sperm parameters among participants.25 However, the effects of inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccines—the most widely used vaccine type in mainland China—on semen quality have not been assessed. We evaluated changes in semen quality before and after inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccination among men in China.

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CME Disclosure Statement: Unless noted, all individuals in control of content reported no relevant financial relationships. If applicable, all relevant financial relationships have been mitigated.

Article Information

Accepted for Publication: July 22, 2022.

Published: September 8, 2022. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.30631

Open Access: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the CC-BY License. © 2022 Huang J et al. JAMA Network Open.

Corresponding Authors: Jiaying Lin, MD, Department of Assisted Reproduction, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 639 Zhizaoju Rd, Huangpu District, Shanghai 200011, China (lemon_1114@126.com); or Qiongfang Wu, MD, Center for Reproductive Medicine, Jiangxi Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Nanchang University School of Medicine, 318 Bayi Ave, Donghu District, Nanchang 330006, China (wuqfivf@126.com).

Author Contributions: Drs Huang and Wu had full access to all of the data in the study and take responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis. Dr Huang, Mr Xia, and Dr Tian contributed equally to this work and are considered co–first authors.

Concept and design: Huang, Xia, Fang, Wu.

Acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data: Huang, Xia, Tian, Xu, Lin, Wu.

Drafting of the manuscript: Huang, Lin.

Critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content: Huang, Xia, Tian, Xu, Fang, Wu.

Statistical analysis: Huang, Xia.

Obtained funding: Tian, Wu.

Administrative, technical, or material support: Xu, Fang, Lin.

Supervision: Wu.

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported.

Funding/Support: This study was funded by grant 81960288 from the National Natural Science Foundation of China, grant 20203BBGL73159 from the Key Research and Development Program of Jiangxi Province, and grant 20211008 from the Science and Technology Project of Jiangxi Provincial Health Commission.

Role of the Funder/Sponsor: The funders had no role in the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript; and decision to submit the manuscript for publication.

Additional Contributions: We thank the patients for their participation in this study and their cooperation during follow-up. We also thank the staff members at the Center for Reproductive Medicine of Jiangxi Maternal and Child Health Hospital who contributed to database construction and quality management.

References
1.
Diaz  P , Reddy  P , Ramasahayam  R , Kuchakulla  M , Ramasamy  R .  COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy linked to increased internet search queries for side effects on fertility potential in the initial rollout phase following emergency use authorization.   Andrologia. 2021;53(9):e14156. doi:10.1111/and.14156 PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
2.
Gonzalez  DC , Nassau  DE , Khodamoradi  K ,  et al.  Sperm parameters before and after COVID-19 mRNA vaccination.   JAMA. 2021;326(3):273-274. doi:10.1001/jama.2021.9976 PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
3.
Safrai  M , Herzberg  S , Imbar  T , Reubinoff  B , Dior  U , Ben-Meir  A .  The BNT162b2 mRNA Covid-19 vaccine does not impair sperm parameters.   Reprod Biomed Online. 2022;44(4):685-688. doi:10.1016/j.rbmo.2022.01.008 PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
4.
Lifshitz  D , Haas  J , Lebovitz  O , Raviv  G , Orvieto  R , Aizer  A .  Does mRNA SARS-CoV-2 vaccine detrimentally affect male fertility, as reflected by semen analysis?   Reprod Biomed Online. 2022;44(1):145-149. doi:10.1016/j.rbmo.2021.09.021 PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
5.
Reschini  M , Pagliardini  L , Boeri  L ,  et al.  COVID-19 vaccination does not affect reproductive health parameters in men.   Front Public Health. 2022;10:839967. doi:10.3389/fpubh.2022.839967 PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
6.
World Health Organization.  WHO Laboratory Manual for the Examination and Processing of Human Semen. 5th ed. World Health Organization Department of Reproductive Health and Research; 2010.
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