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Evaluation of Risk Factors for Conversion From a COVID-19 Household Contact to a Case in New York City, August 1, 2020, to July 31, 2021

Educational Objective
To identify the key insights or developments described in this article
1 Credit CME

SARS-CoV-2 is commonly transmitted in the household, and the risk of converting to a case after a household exposure is generally higher than in other settings, largely reflecting the challenges of quarantine and isolation for persons living in the same dwelling.1,2 We analyzed data from more than 600 000 household contacts in New York City (NYC) to characterize the risks of acquiring infection after household exposure.

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CME Disclosure Statement: Unless noted, all individuals in control of content reported no relevant financial relationships. If applicable, all relevant financial relationships have been mitigated.

Article Information

Accepted for Publication: August 3, 2022.

Published: September 14, 2022. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.33001

Open Access: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the CC-BY License. © 2022 Whittemore K et al. JAMA Network Open.

Corresponding Author: Katherine Whittemore, MPH, New York City Health and Hospitals, 50 Water St, New York, NY 10004 (katewhittemore36@gmail.com).

Author Contributions: Ms Whittemore and Dr Foerster had full access to all the data in the study and take responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis.

Concept and design: All authors.

Acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data: Whittemore, Foerster, Blaney, Vora.

Drafting of the manuscript: Whittemore, Vora.

Critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content: All authors.

Statistical analysis: Whittemore, Foerster.

Obtained funding: Vora.

Administrative, technical, or material support: Blaney, Vora.

Supervision: Long, Vora.

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported.

References
1.
Thompson  HA , Mousa  A , Dighe  A ,  et al.  Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) setting–specific transmission rates: a systematic review and meta-analysis.   Clin Infect Dis. 2021;73(3):e754-e764. doi:10.1093/cid/ciab100PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
2.
Madewell  ZJ , Yang  Y , Longini  IM  Jr , Halloran  ME , Dean  NE .  Household secondary attack rates of SARS-CoV-2 by variant and vaccination status: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis.   JAMA Netw Open. 2022;5(4):e229317-e229317. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.9317PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
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