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Corneal Wound Associated With Orthokeratology Lenses

To identify the key insights or developments described in this article
1 Credit CME

A 10-year-old girl presented with acute pain and tearing in the left eye after waking up. She was wearing orthokeratology lenses, which she had inserted herself, the night before. She had a history of stinging in her left eye with orthokeratology lens wear. Slitlamp microscopy revealed a crescent-shaped corneal epithelial defect delineated by fluorescein stain and diffuse conjunctival congestion (Figure). The corneal abrasion coincided with the curved edge of the orthokeratology lens. Myopia develops rapidly primarily during childhood, and overnight orthokeratology is a popular choice among East Asian parents for myopia control.1 Safety of orthokeratology lens use cannot be ignored in children at home. The rigid lens material can result in corneal abrasions if the orthokeratology lens–wearing protocols are not strictly followed, especially when parental involvement is absent. Furthermore, bacterial corneal ulcers have been reported related to orthokeratology lens wear.2 The girl was prescribed levofloxacin eye gel and stopped wearing contact lenses. One week later, the corneal wound healed without any complications.

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CME Disclosure Statement: Unless noted, all individuals in control of content reported no relevant financial relationships. If applicable, all relevant financial relationships have been mitigated.

Article Information

Corresponding Author: Yao Ni, MD, PhD, State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, 54S Xianlie Rd, Guangzhou 510060, China (niyao@gzzoc.com).

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported.

Additional Contributions: We thank the patient’s guardian for granting permission to publish this information.

References
1.
Cho  P , Tan  Q .  Myopia and orthokeratology for myopia control.   Clin Exp Optom. 2019;102(4):364-377. doi:10.1111/cxo.12839PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
2.
Liu  YM , Xie  P .  The safety of orthokeratology: a systematic review.   Eye Contact Lens. 2016;42(1):35-42. doi:10.1097/ICL.0000000000000219PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
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