[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]

Association of SARS-CoV-2 Infection With New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes Among Pediatric Patients From 2020 to 2021

Educational Objective
To identify the key insights or developments described in this article
1 Credit CME

Incidence of new-onset type 1 diabetes (T1D) increased during the COVID-19 pandemic,1 and this increase has been associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection.2 The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that pediatric patients with COVID-19 were more likely to be diagnosed with diabetes after infection, although types 1 and 2 were not separated.3 Therefore, whether COVID-19 was associated with new-onset T1D among youths remains unclear. This cohort study assessed whether there was an increase in new diagnoses of T1D among pediatric patients after COVID-19.

Sign in to take quiz and track your certificates

Buy This Activity

JN Learning™ is the home for CME and MOC from the JAMA Network. Search by specialty or US state and earn AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ from articles, audio, Clinical Challenges and more. Learn more about CME/MOC

CME Disclosure Statement: Unless noted, all individuals in control of content reported no relevant financial relationships. If applicable, all relevant financial relationships have been mitigated.

Article Information

Accepted for Publication: August 6, 2022.

Published: September 23, 2022. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.33014

Open Access: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the CC-BY License. © 2022 Kendall EK et al. JAMA Network Open.

Corresponding Author: Rong Xu, PhD, Sears Tower T303, Center for Artificial Intelligence in Drug Discovery (rxx@case.edu); Pamela B. Davis, MD, PhD, Sears Tower T402, Center for Community Health Integration (pbd@case.edu), Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44106.

Author Contributions: Ms Kendall and Ms Olaker had full access to all of the data in the study and take responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis.

Concept and design: Kendall, Xu, Davis.

Acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data: Kendall, Olaker, Kaelber, Xu.

Drafting of the manuscript: Kendall, Olaker.

Critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content: Kendall, Kaelber, Xu, Davis.

Statistical analysis: Kendall, Olaker, Xu.

Obtained funding: Xu.

Administrative, technical, or material support: All authors.

Supervision: Kaelber, Xu, Davis.

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: Dr Kaelber reported receiving grants from the National Institutes of Health during the conduct of the study. No other disclosures were reported.

Funding/Support: This study was supported by grants AG057557 (Dr Xu), AG061388 (Dr Xu), AG062272 (Dr Xu), and AG076649 (Drs Xu and Davis) from the National Institute on Aging; grant R01AA029831 (Drs Xu and Davis) from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; grant UG1DA049435 from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and grant 1UL1TR002548-01 from the Clinical and Translational Science Collaborative of Cleveland.

Role of the Funder/Sponsor: The funders had no role in the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript; and decision to submit the manuscript for publication.

Disclaimer: The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

References
1.
Gottesman  BL , Yu  J , Tanaka  C , Longhurst  CA , Kim  JJ .  Incidence of new-onset type 1 diabetes among US children during the COVID-19 global pandemic.   JAMA Pediatr. 2022;176(4):414-415. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2021.5801PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
2.
Qeadan  F , Tingey  B , Egbert  J ,  et al.  The associations between COVID-19 diagnosis, type 1 diabetes, and the risk of diabetic ketoacidosis: a nationwide cohort from the US using the Cerner real-world data.   PLoS One. 2022;17(4):e0266809. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0266809Google Scholar
3.
Barrett  CE , Koyama  AK , Alvarez  P ,  et al.  Risk for newly diagnosed diabetes >30 days after SARS-CoV-2 infection among persons aged <18 years—United States.   MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2022;71(2):59-65. doi:10.15585/mmwr.mm7102e2PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
4.
TriNetX. Home page. Accessed April 4, 2022. https://trinetx.com/
5.
Taquet  M , Geddes  JR , Husain  M , Luciano  S , Harrison  PJ .  6-month neurological and psychiatric outcomes in 236 379 survivors of COVID-19: a retrospective cohort study using electronic health records.   Lancet Psychiatry. 2021;8(5):416-427. doi:10.1016/S2215-0366(21)00084-5PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
6.
Lönnrot  M , Lynch  KF , Elding Larsson  H ,  et al; TEDDY Study Group.  Respiratory infections are temporally associated with initiation of type 1 diabetes autoimmunity: the TEDDY study.   Diabetologia. 2017;60(10):1931-1940. doi:10.1007/s00125-017-4365-5PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
Close
Want full access to the AMA Ed Hub?
After you sign up for AMA Membership, make sure you sign in or create a Physician account with the AMA in order to access all learning activities on the AMA Ed Hub
Buy this activity
Close
Want full access to the AMA Ed Hub?
After you sign up for AMA Membership, make sure you sign in or create a Physician account with the AMA in order to access all learning activities on the AMA Ed Hub
Buy this activity
Close
With a personal account, you can:
  • Access free activities and track your credits
  • Personalize content alerts
  • Customize your interests
  • Fully personalize your learning experience
Education Center Collection Sign In Modal Right
Close

Name Your Search

Save Search
With a personal account, you can:
  • Access free activities and track your credits
  • Personalize content alerts
  • Customize your interests
  • Fully personalize your learning experience
Close
Close

Lookup An Activity

or

My Saved Searches

You currently have no searches saved.

Close

My Saved Courses

You currently have no courses saved.

Close