[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]

Flying Intervention Team vs Patient Interhospital Transfer in Acute Ischemic Stroke

In a nonrandomized controlled intervention study published in JAMA, researchers in Germany assessed whether deployment of a flying interventional team, consisting of a neurointerventional radiologist and an angiography assistant, was associated with a shorter time to endovascular thrombectomy for patients in rural or intermediate population areas in Southeast Bavaria. This video explains the study design.

Click the Related Article link for full details.

JN Learning™ is the home for CME and MOC from the JAMA Network. Search by specialty or US state and earn AMA PRA Category 1 CME Credit™ from articles, audio, Clinical Challenges and more. Learn more about CME/MOC

CME Disclosure Statement: Unless noted, all individuals in control of content reported no relevant financial relationships. If applicable, all relevant financial relationships have been mitigated.

Transcript

In a nonrandomized controlled intervention study published in JAMA, researchers in Germany asked if deployment of a flying intervention team, consisting of a neurointerventional radiologist and an angiography assistant, was associated with a shorter time to endovascular thrombectomy for patients in rural or intermediate population areas in Southeast Bavaria, since timely treatment with mechanical thrombectomy can be difficult for patients to access if they live far from hospitals staffed for endovascular services.

Adults with acute ischemic stroke due to large vessel occlusion presented to one of 13 participating primary stroke centers in the Telemedic Stroke Network in Southeast Bavaria equipped with an angio suite but lacking onsite neurointerventional expertise. Patients were allocated by week of presentation to either conventional interhospital transfer to a comprehensive stroke center for treatment, or on-site treatment by the flying intervention team.

In the conventional treatment group, assessed patients requiring endovascular thrombectomy were transferred to one of 5 comprehensive stroke centers for treatment, 3 located in lower density population areas and 2 in the Munich metro area.

In contrast, for the flying intervention team group, once patients were determined to require endovascular thrombectomy, a flying intervention team was alerted and deployed via helicopter from one of the 2 comprehensive stroke centers located in Munich. Concurrent with team deployment, patients were prepped for treatment on-site in the primary stroke center's angio suite by a local surgical team.

Both groups received acute stroke treatment at admitting primary stroke centers until decision to pursue endovascular thrombectomy was determined and followed the same standard operating procedures. The primary endpoint of the trial was how quickly thrombectomy was performed after the decision to pursue thrombectomy was reached.

With a personal account, you can:
  • Access free activities and track your credits
  • Personalize content alerts
  • Customize your interests
  • Fully personalize your learning experience
Education Center Collection Sign In Modal Right
Close

Name Your Search

Save Search
Close
With a personal account, you can:
  • Access free activities and track your credits
  • Personalize content alerts
  • Customize your interests
  • Fully personalize your learning experience
Close

Lookup An Activity

or

Close

My Saved Searches

You currently have no searches saved.

Close

My Saved Courses

You currently have no courses saved.

Close
With a personal account, you can:
  • Access free activities and track your credits
  • Personalize content alerts
  • Customize your interests
  • Fully personalize your learning experience
Education Center Collection Sign In Modal Right
Close