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hypertension May 21, 2021

3 Tools to Help Health Care Students Accurately Measure Blood Pressure

  1. Nearly half of US adults are living with high blood pressure (BP) – a leading risk factor for heart attack and stroke. Accurate BP measurement is vital to improving BP control, as inaccuracies can lead to improper screening, diagnosis and management. Market research shows BP is not measured accurately on a consistent basis in the clinical setting.

    In this series of three interactive modules, learn key foundational BP measurement skills using the AMA’s best practices to help patients detect health issues early on and ultimately reduce the prevalence of chronic disease in collaboration with your future care team.

  2. Hear what students are saying about the module.

  3. BP Measurement Essentials: Student Edition

    Over 116 million US adults suffer from high BP. By understanding the basics of in-office BP measurement and self-measured BP (SMBP) monitoring, you'll have a more informed approach to treating hypertension. This module should be taken early in clinical skills training to build a solid BP measurement foundation.

  4. SMBP Essentials: Student Edition

    When combined with clinical support, SMBP can be a powerful tool for patients to take ownership of their hypertension management. In this module, you’ll learn the importance of SMBP and the right equipment to use. This should be taken later in school after the completion of the BP Measurement Essentials module.

  5. BP Measurement Refresher: Student Edition

    Research shows that BP measurement skills slowly decline after several months. From preparing and positioning a patient for BP measurement to identifying the different categories of BP, this module should be taken on an as-needed basis throughout your education and career to keep skills fresh and up to date.

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